A pro-choice community for Catholic women who have had abortions, as well as those who support full, legal access to reproductive health. Speak out, share your story, or show your support.

Anonymous asked:
When I say I offered Mass for you I mean that I made you my special intention for Mass and asked Jesus in the Eucharist to give you special graces. Just thought you would appreciate a few extra graces and some more Jesus love! :)

Was a bit confused at first, but thank you! :)

xx

Anonymous asked:
Hi! I offered Mass for you yesterday! Hope everything is going well! God bless you! :)

Thank you… I think?

Hope you had a good day, too!

xx

Women deserve a space to talk about their abortions

I have to say this again and again because of the messages I regularly receive. 

Women deserve a space to talk about their abortions. Women deserve a space to talk about their abortions. Women deserve a space to talk about their abortions.

Why My Grandmother Was Pro-Choice (and Why I Am Too)

forthecatholicgirls:

My grandmother taught me to be Catholic. I would ride the bus with her each Sunday morning to mass, where she taught me how to cross my hands and to never leave before the priest walks down the aisle. She taught me how to say the rosary, and ask Mary for guidance. She taught me how to give even when you had very little. She taught me how to be respectful and modest and, perhaps most significant of all, how to endure. 

Being the pious Catholic that she was, my grandmother did not believe in divorce, and refused to get one from my grandfather, an abusive alcoholic. (My mom will be the first person to tell you that the effects of child abuse last a lifetime.) They had very little money, and my grandmother had to hide her savings, which she earned from cleaning houses, from my grandfather each week. They separated eventually, after my mother’s wedding, and he lived on the streets for years until he wound up in a state-funded nursing home, where my grandmother would visit him once a month. She kept him in her prayers until he died.

At my grandmother’s wake, I sat alone in the very front, eyes focused on the casket yet never really seeing it. I refused to speak to anyone, even immediate family members. The only person I spoke to that day was a nun, who took my hand and told me she was a good friend of my grandmother’s, that she was a wonderful woman, selfless and strong and spiritual. A true Catholic. That’s when I knew I lost someone truly great.

Years later, my mother told me—out of nowhere, really—that my grandmother had always been pro-choice. She didn’t believe in divorce, yet she thought a woman had the right to an abortion. A child, she thought, could not save an unhappy marriage. A woman, she believed, should be saved if she risked death. My grandmother was born in 1921, and had her children between 1948 and 1952, decades before Roe v. Wade. It made me wonder, knowing how involved she was in her tight-knit Polish-American community, if she had taken a friend for an illegal abortion. It made me wonder if the one miscarriage she endured was not actually a miscarriage. It made me wonder if she knew something that I didn’t. 

My grandmother taught me to be Catholic. And she also taught me to be pro-choice.

Many people have been asking me why I’m pro-choice; my reasons are endless and not always so black-and-white. The foremost reason why I’m pro-choice is what I learned from my grandmother: we live in an imperfect world, where absolutions don’t always apply. 

I’m pro-choice because you can’t legislate women’s lives. 

I’m pro-choice because reproductive rights is integral to social justice. That doesn’t have to include abortion, but it certainly must include the right to affordable and accessible birth control. Forty percent of children in South America live in poverty. Seventy-one percent of the global poor are women. Social justice does not start in the womb; it starts with women. 

I’m pro-choice because it does not denigrate life; it values it. I value the life of each woman on Earth, and I want each and every one of us to have autonomy over our bodies and minds. To do what is best for us and our families. To be saved when our lives or mental health are at risk.

I’m pro-choice because I do not categorize women into groups: the good girls v. the bad girls. The pure ones v. the slutty ones. The ones who have abortions v. the ones who don’t. Women who have abortions are not “broken women” or “bad women” or “selfish women.” They are women. 

I’m pro-choice because we can’t perpetuate the myths that abortions for health issues, or as the result of rape, are “rare.” Though 2 percent sounds small, it’s 20,000 women per year in America. That’s far too many women to say, “Oh, that never happens, so let’s not talk about it.” 

I’m pro-choice because women should not be forced to die when suffering from a complicated pregnancy. We have too much modern medicine to just sit back and watch as a women suffers in her hospital bed. 

I’m pro-choice because there’s nothing pro-life about protesting in front of an independent clinic that can’t afford security because you most likely voted against funding low-income health programs. You’re not helping any one except yourself. Hold a woman’s hand, throw away those photoshopped flyers, and pray the rosary later.

I’m pro-choice because being pro-life, in both America and around the world, means you’re standing in the way of women receiving affordable, comprehensive health care. Because you’re so focused on what you’re against that you’re blind to the good, the necessary, the justice that you could be providing.

I’m pro-choice because I don’t believe in dictating another’s life by our own narrow-minded, incredibly sheltered world views. Not all women have the same experiences, and for you to think they do is elitist and patronizing.

I’m pro-choice because my grandmother never had a choice, and through her struggles, I now have one. And that—a better, fuller, more complete life—is what she always wanted for my mother and me.

xx

Call For Submissions: Why You Can Be Religious And Approve Of Contraception

forthecatholicgirls:

The recent Hobby Lobby ruling has obviously made religion and contraception a heated debate. But not all religious people share the beliefs of Hobby Lobby’s owners — actually, quite a few disagree. If you’re religious, or identify with a religious group, and approve of contraception, send in a submission saying why! Let’s change the narrative on who uses and approves the use of birth control, and why it’s needed!

Send your submissions here and I will upload them on the blog throughout the week.

xx

And thank you so much for reading! <3
xx

And thank you so much for reading! <3

xx

A Question to Fellow Catholics

chestofsillies:

How to evangelize and herald difficult truths (like the teaching on abortion) without putting other people off? How to do it with love and compassion for the other person? How to touch the other person’s heart so they would actually want to think about what you are trying to say?

Any suggestions?

Try listening to women who have had abortions (Catholic and non-Catholic alike) first.

xx

"Reproductive care is health care"

[Ed. note: This post is a submission in a series of why one can be religious, or affiliated with a religious group, and still approve the use of contraception. To submit a post on this issue, go here.]

You can be religious and pro-life. You can believe that life starts at first breath or when there’s a heart beat as I know many do- as there are a lot of Biblical suggestions of this theory. Or you can simply allow others to decide when they believe life (ensoulment) starts while holding your own beliefs personally- basically, you don’t have to push your views on others. Nonetheless, reproductive care is health care and as Christians we should always advocate that everyone have the same access to health care.

I also just want to say Thank you for all that you do on this blog! Keep up the good work!

semper-spes-est:

forthecatholicgirls:

This Hobby Lobby Tumblr talk is insane. I swear, all I think of is, “There are other ways to get birth control. Why don’t you just pay for it yourself or use a condom?” all I hear is “There are others way to treat that UTI. Why don’t you just pay for those antibiotics out of pocket or drink cranberry juice?”

Both can work. Sometimes condoms work great! Sometimes cranberry juice is all you need for a UTI! But last time I checked, healthcare is healthcare, no matter which part of the body it’s treating. To apply this Hobby Lobby ruling to *only* women and contraception shows that something about a woman’s reproductive organs make you squeamish and uncomfortable. To treat women as “exemptions” to the men’s health is not only just plain wrong, but it’s also part of the problem: You’re essentially taking women (and those who don’t identify as women) out of the equation, making women the “other” so they can fit into your “men and women have sex, women get pregnant, women are mothers” narrative. 

Real talk: 1) pregnancy is a medical condition.  2) Birth control is not just about sex. 

xx

Birth control is inherently, inextricably about sex. No one would take birth control to prevent a stomachache. If they would, the word “birth” needs to be removed from the nomenclature.

Just because someone doesn’t want to support a desecration of Creation doesn’t mean they’re squeamish about reproductive organs. That makes little room for there to be any sense among women who are pro-life, them being people squeamish about their own body.

You’re essentially taking reproduction out of the equation, leaving it on the sidelines like a substitute likelier to get some water than get put into the game.

 ”inextricably about sex” 

Nope, it’s not. And actually, many people take birth control not for stomaches, per se, but for bad cramps (which can be worse than stomaches).

"You’re essentially taking reproduction out of the equation,"

Whether or not a woman — or people — want to reproduce is not up for you or a group of men to decide. Some people want to reproduce, some people don’t. Some people want to reproduce but they can’t afford to at the moment. There is no desecration of Creation when a woman and her partner want to plan their pregnancies. In fact, women live better lives all around when they *can* plan their pregnancies. I also fail to see this so-called “desecration of Creation” because nothing is being destroyed when a woman takes birth control or Plan B, or uses an IUD. I think you’re overstating things with your hyperbole. 

Catholic on BC

[Ed. note: This post is a submission in a series of why one can be religious, or affiliated with a religious group, and still approve the use of contraception. To submit a post on this issue, go here.]

I’ve been raised Catholic my whole life. I was baptized and went to a Catholic school from Kindergarten to 8th grade, but myself and my family believe strongly in birth control. I myself am on the birth control pill Junel 1/20.
We believe that all women should have access to affordable (if not free) birth control. When my mother was 14 she had uterine cysts that she needed treatment for even though she was in no way sexually active. She needed various hormones to help go along with the treatment and prevent ovulation and periods. Even further than the medical applications of birth control, women should all have full control over their sex lives. If men were the ones to get pregnant then they would have FREE birth control at pharmacy. Even though people are of the same religion there can be varying degrees to which they believe and there are hundreds of ways to interpret something. Religious freedom is freedom for someone to say “look I don’t believe that birth control is moral. So I, myself, will not use it.” Religious freedom is not saying “I don’t believe in this so no one else should have it.” That’s just forcing your beliefs on someone else.

Call For Submissions: Why You Can Be Religious And Approve Of Contraception

The recent Hobby Lobby ruling has obviously made religion and contraception a heated debate. But not all religious people share the beliefs of Hobby Lobby’s owners — actually, quite a few disagree. If you’re religious, or identify with a religious group, and approve of contraception, send in a submission saying why! Let’s change the narrative on who uses and approves the use of birth control, and why it’s needed!

Send your submissions here and I will upload them on the blog throughout the week.

xx