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September 2014
10
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catholicloveblog

catholicloveblog

#Catholic   
September 2014
10

Wendy Davis Doesn’t Need Your Opinions On Her Abortion

I think what I learned today from this National Review/Wendy Davis disaster is no one listens to women* who have had abortions, especially when their narratives aren’t the ones they want to hear.

But you know what was one of the first things we learned about in Catholic youth group way back when? How to be an active listener

September 2014
10

Friendly reminder that the reason you had an abortion is your reason alone, and you don’t need to justify or prove it to a white, male “journalist” writing for the National Review Online. 

September 2014
10

Reproductive Justice

Reproductive Justice is the complete physical, mental, spiritual, political, social, and economic well-being of women and girls, based on the full achievement and protection of women’s human rights:

(1) the right to have a child; (2) the right not to have a child; and (3) the right to parent the children we have, as well as to control our birthing options, such as midwifery. We also fight for the necessary enabling conditions to realize these rights. [x]

September 2014
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Anonymous asked

How on earth does Abby Johnson go from PP director (who was described by colleagues as very pro-choice) to pro-life extremist? I feel like she has some kind of hidden agenda...

pro-choice-or-no-voice:

Oh but we are all pretty sure she did. Short story? She was doing very bad at her job and “switched teams” knowing she could create and uproar and a name for herself, she was promised security on the “other side” and took it. That’s about it. All of her claims have been proven false, but if you want to read more about it, we have a whole tag on her  -cylina

September 2014
09

Anonymous asked

I do thank you for this blog, because it does have some interesting discussion, but have you ever wondered why the church teaches what it teaches? And maybe try to see why the church and its people really should follow through with what it teaches. I identify myself as a Catholic feminist.I feel empowered through the churches teachings towards sexuality. I would personally like to see more of those stories on here as well, because having just one side of the story is not enough.

Hi, thank you so much for reading! Glad to have you here. I do identify as a Catholic feminist as well, except I don’t identify with the Church’s “new feminism” for various reasons: I’m wary of any feminism created by a man, and I also don’t believe in a feminism that reinforces gender roles—especially one that’s so rooted in biological essentialism, and uses your biological make-up to define your cultural role (and place) in society. In almost all ways, that’s the antithesis of feminism. This is not saying that I want female supremacy, or that you can’t be feminine, or that I’m totally rejecting so-called “womanhood”; it’s that “womanhood” is a spectrum, not a monolith. It’s not defined by the possibility of marriage and bearing children, which is what the Church emphasizes. (I’m not sure if you identify with new feminism, but since that’s what the Church states as feminism I want to make it clear.)

My goal here is to not only have a pro-choice space, but also to show that feminism doesn’t have to be antithetical to the Catholic Church. Too many times, I have heard young women saying they left the Church because they were “too feminist.” I call these women the “bad Catholic girls,” and I am one of them. However, I don’t think we’re really as bad as people say we are—and I’ll get back to that.

Have I ever wondered why the Church teaches what it teaches? All the time! I’ve been wondering this ever since I was a 10-year-old altar server. I had just served Mass and was changing in the sacristy when three elderly women came up to me and said, “We just wanted to tell you how happy we are to see a girl on the altar.” I didn’t realize how much it meant to them for a long time but boy, did I think about.

I don’t know how long you’ve been reading, but I’ve also stated on here that I used to be very pro-life, having marched in the March on Life in Washington, D.C. I remember seeing middle-age women with red tape over their mouths, rocking back and forth. Silent. At the time, I thought, How sad, these poor women who had abortions. Now, I still think how sad, but for a different reason: Look how the Church has failed them. Pained them. Silenced them. They were also bad Catholic girls.

So, here’s my problem with new feminism and the Church’s teaching on women: Although new feminism strives to make women complimentary to men, it also creates divisions among Catholic women. It fails to see “womanhood” as a spectrum, fails to take into account lived experiences, and ignores other innate or learned gifts and abilities women may have. To be a Catholic women, you want marriage and children—and this is the highest attainment. These are good Catholic girls. 

I don’t want to get married. It’s not my calling. I’m in a very committed relationship, but wife was never a title for me. But for many people in my Church, this has negated all the work I’ve done with my diocese and beyond. I’m a bad Catholic girl. 

I can also sympathize with women who are childless by choice. It’s not selfish; in fact, having kids just to please God is. My aunt and uncle have been happily married for over 40 years, never had kids; my aunt was a teacher for decades, and those were “her kids.” I would side-eye anyone who tried to tell me their marriage isn’t very Catholic or wrong in the eyes of the Lord. 

I’m happy you felt empowered by the Church’s teachings on sexuality. I didn’t, although I do follow many of the teachings on modesty and enjoy it (thanks, Mom!) And it’s not because I wanted to have “all the sex” and what not, but because I realized I didn’t know myself and my body. Now, I’m not that confused because I don’t let my sexuality define me—and that’s the thing. Sexuality doesn’t define you. Your relationship status doesn’t define you. Your mother or childless status doesn’t define you. And none of that defines your relationship with God—or the Church, for that matter. Your work, your service, your mission, your ideas, your compassion, your peace—that defines you. And none of that has to do with you using a condom in the bedroom.

So, here’s what I believe in a nutshell: There’s no such thing as good Catholic girls and bad Catholic girls. They’re the same woman. 

xx

P.S. You can certainly submit a post on your views!

#Religion   #feminism   #feminist   #Catholic   
September 2014
09
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youngfeministkilljoy:

there are pro-choice Catholics

there are LGBT Catholics (and Catholics who support them)

there are Catholics who have had abortions

there are a million different Catholics

We exist and just because you tell us we can’t be Catholic doesn’t mean you’re right. You do not define our faith.

September 2014
09
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provoicesupportblog:

It’s okay to feel very open about your abortion and share your story, and it’s okay to keep it a private experience and not tell anyone. You are not alone in either choice.

September 2014
09

baronmagdalene asked

Have you heard of the book Taking Back God by Leora Tanenbaum? I'm reading it and I think you'd really appreciate it

I haven’t, but I just looked it up and it sounds awesome! Thanks for the recommendation! 

xx

September 2014
09
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Anonymous asked

Why don't you join a church denomination that is sex positive and supportive of LGBT people? Like episcopalian?

spiralingquestions:

forthecatholicgirls:

That is an interesting question, and it’s a personal decision so there’s not one answer for everyone. For starters, once a baptized Catholic, always a Catholic. Second, it’s not so easy to go from Catholicism to Protestantism.  They’re two very, very different faiths, and a lot of people can’t make that leap (it’s not like switching from one Protestant denomination to another one). There are Catholics, however, who do convert to Episcopalian because it is the closest to Catholicism. Third, there are people who love their Catholic faith and believe being Catholic doesn’t amount to just living your life by a “Catholic checklist,” so they want change within the Church — and the best way for change is from within.

xx

"once a baptized Catholic, always a Catholic" makes me cringe.  When 14 year old me told my principal that I wasn’t going to be Confirmed because I didn’t believe the Confirmation vows & I didn’t want to lie, that’s what she told me.  She then commenced to encourage students, faculty, and staff to harass me all day every day.

It is up to the individual person to determine what their baptism means for them, particularly when that person was baptized before they understood what it meant.
I understand that this isn’t a very Catholic point of view.  But the deference to authority and community-preservation are precisely what led to the semester’s worth of death threats I received.  I admit that I prioritize the individual over uniformity, and make clear my reasons.

Again, regarding infant baptism, the meaning of what is done without a person’s consent is up to the person to determine.  And if an adult chooses baptism at one point and later discovers that Catholicism isn’t working for them anymore, it is up to that adult to determine what that previous choice means.

"It is up to the individual person to determine what their baptism means for them" — That’s essentially what Confirmation is. That seals your choice of entering fully into the Church. You choose to be confirmed, and have a right not to be confirmed, though, and no one should have harassed you or sent you death threats for it. 

But, once you’re baptized you are a member of the Church and are open to the other sacraments, if you want them. Again, the power — and perhaps to some, intimidation — of these sacraments may be why many baptized Catholics become lapsed instead of seeking out a new religion. (And for people who are baptized and confirmed, it can be very spiritually difficult to join a Protestant church.)

xx

P.S. It would be nice if everyone waited until they were 18 to choose a religion, but…parents, I guess.

September 2014
09
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she-who-loves-the-rain:

The Catholic Church Prefers Medieval Barbarism to Modern Abortion

safe-abortion-womens-right:

By

This is a true story from a country in Europe, a country one would normally deem civilized.

A foreign woman (nation of birth unspecified) arrives in the European country, seeking asylum. Having been raped in her native land, she discovers after her immigration that she’s…

This is horrible!

#abortion   #Catholic   #women   #Ireland   
September 2014
08

Anonymous asked

Are you pro same sex marriage too? I want to be catholic so had but I'm pro choice pro same sex marriage and for women's ordination, I'm thinking i should he episcopalian but I know in my heart it doesn't have the full deposit of faith like Catholicism does, Catholicism is my one and only <3 help!

Hi, thanks so much for your message! I have received messages in the past about joining the Episcopal Church, and it’s definitely something to consider, but I also agree that it’s hard to leave the Catholic faith! I suspect this is why many Catholics become lapsed instead of converting to Protestantism—that’s not an easy move.

This was the most recent post from someone asking why not joining the Episcopal Church (I know I have more buried in this blog)…

http://forthecatholicgirls.tumblr.com/post/93987689612/why-dont-you-join-a-church-denomination-that-is-sex

…but it’s a very personal decision to make. HOWEVER, there are other Catholic ministries out there who are actively working on those issues that you care about: LGBTQ equality, pro-choice, and women’s ordination. That’s perhaps why I stayed—when I met people who were actively working within the Church for change. And not change for just themselves, but for groups of people who’ve long been marginalized by the Church and society. 

If you support LGBTQ rights but feel uncomfortable with the Church, I suggest you look into Dignity USA and News Ways Ministry. Both organizations deal exclusively with gay Catholics (and allies)—New Ways was even started by a nun!

Here’s the website for Dignity USA—they’re located in Massachusetts but have chapters across the U.S., where you can participate in a more inclusive liturgy: http://www.dignityusa.org

And here’s New Ways Ministry: http://www.newwaysministry.org

Also, here’s a post a follower submitted on the Bible and being pro-LGBTQ:

http://forthecatholicgirls.tumblr.com/post/55047328078/submission-on-the-bible-being-pro-or-anti-gay

So, women’s ordination: that’s a touchy subject for many folks and I don’t know if I want to open up Pandora’s Box on that (but like you, I do support it). I think instead I’ll leave with you some nice messages from other Catholics who are calling for what you want—a Church made of its people, with a reformed hierarchy that works to bring everyone’s voices to the table. Maybe some day in the near future I’ll write more about women’s ordination…

http://forthecatholicgirls.tumblr.com/post/54345971608/every-other-practicing-catholic-knows-its-wrong

http://forthecatholicgirls.tumblr.com/post/54368711136/let-us-remember-that-christ-said-absolutely-nothing

http://forthecatholicgirls.tumblr.com/post/56662203882/im-a-catholic-girl-who-is-strongly-pro-choice-and-i

xx

September 2014
08

Anonymous asked

"the Catholic Church in its history has never decided on the time of ensoulment." Actually, the Catechism states: "1711 Endowed with a spiritual soul, with intellect and with free will, the human person is *from his very conception* ordered to God and destined for eternal beatitude." And "2274 Since it must be treated from conception as a person, the embryo must be defended in its integrity, cared for, and healed, as far as possible, like any other human being." Ensoulment occurs at conception.

No, that’s not exactly what the Catechism is saying—you’re misreading 1711. The Church has admitted in the Declaration on Procured Abortion (1974) that there has been no definitive point of ensoulment among the magisterium, acknowledging that these views have also changed over centuries.  

xx

September 2014
08

wepreferintellectualbadass asked

FINALLY I HAVE FOUND OUT THAT THERE ARE OTHER PRO-CHOICE CATHOLICS, THIS MAKES ME SO HAPPY :D I got into so many arguments at CathSoc about it that I just stopped going and even considered whether Catholicism was the right faith for me.

Hi, I’m glad you’re here! I have to make a more comprehensive list, but for now, please feel free to scroll through past posts because there’s definitely been stories and posts on being a pro-choice Catholic (or a progressive Catholic)!

xx

P.S. There are SO many pro-choice Catholics. Check out Catholics For Choice!

September 2014
08
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Abby Johnson: Contraception DOESN'T reduce the number of abortions 

oh-snap-pro-choice:

by-grace-of-god:

When I worked for Planned Parenthood, I said this ALL of the time.  “The only way to reduce the number of abortions is to reduce the number of unintended pregnancies.  The only way to reduce the number of unintended pregnancies is to increase the supply of contraceptive methods.”  I wish I had a dollar for every time I said that to a legislator or a media reporter, a client…or even myself.  It kind of seems to make sense when you look at it.  But, in reality, it makes no sense at all.  It was just another justification I told myself over and over again to help me feel better about the abortions I was party to.  “I am just trying to decrease the number by working here!”  Yeah right. 

Studies show that contraception DOESN’T actually reduce the number of abortions.  A recent study actually showed the opposite.  The higher the contraception rate, the higher the abortion rate.  Interesting, huh??  Guttmacher Institute (Planned Parenthood’s hired research firm) actually showed similar statistics.  On their website, www.guttmacher.com, they show that 60% of abortive women state that they were using a contraceptive method at the time they got pregnant.  Hmmm.  I thought the “typical” (failure) rate of hormonal and barrier methods was around 5-10%.  Guess someone got that wrong!!  And here’s the truth from my experience.  I rarely counseled a women who was having an abortion that wasn’t using a method when she got pregnant.  That is the truth.  Yes, there are some women who say…well, I just wasn’t using anything!  But most were using something; condoms, the pill (most common), depo, IUD, SOMETHING! 

And OF COURSE they would be on a method!  Our society today makes women feel like it is riskier NOT to be on a hormonal method.  Totally ridiculous.  It is risky TO BE pumping artificial hormones into your body!!  These hormones have been linked to reproductive cancers, strokes, heart disease, osteoporosis, nerve disorders, future infertility, food allergies, metabolic disorders, and many other things!!  But we think it is riskier NOT to take them??  We think getting pregnant is riskier than those diseases I listed above??  Really?  And you know what makes this even better?  All of those risks are listed in the package insert.  But no one takes the time to read them…and your doctor sure doesn’t take the time to go over them with you.  Doctors give out birth control pills like they are handing out M&M’s.  They treat women like we are too stupid to understand our bodies.  Like we are second class citizens when it comes to health care.  And, honestly, we are partially to blame to for that.  We have allowed it happen. 

Birth control enslaves women to their fertility.  It puts all of the responsibility on them.  And that is exactly what it was intended to do.  Birth control was created so that people could have sex without consequences.  What has happened since then?  Women are turned into sexual objects for men to yearn for…and we allow ourselves to be lusted after.  All for a society of sex without consequences.  That is not what sex was intended for.  That is not what fertility was intended for.  Fertility was meant to be a shared partnership between a husband and wife.  A partnership that is open to life.  Where the possibility of life is not seen as a burden, but a gift.  Now, I am practical.  I am not saying that you have to pop out kids like you change your socks.  My husband and I have chosen to use Natural Family Planning, the Creighton Model.  It is a very advanced form of fertility management that allows both partners to be involved…the way it was intended.  That model may not be for you.  You may choose something else.  But, I think if women actually knew the dangers of hormonal birth control, they would not likely take it. 

One more thing.  When do you think life begins?  I believe life begins at conception…when the egg and sperm meet.  Conception is when DNA is formed and a human life is formed.  If you also believe life begins at conception, then you should have a hard time getting behind hormonal methods.  Hormonal methods work three ways.  One way is to prevent ovulation.  But if that fails and “breakthrough ovulation” occurs, then conception can occur.  Another way hormonal methods work is by irritating the uterine lining to the point that a fertilized egg (a human person) would not be able to implant on the uterine wall and begin to grow.  So, the woman passes the fertilized egg (human person) with her cycle and miscarries without even knowing it.  It is sad, but that happens MANY times while women are on hormonal methods.  That is why people will say that hormonal methods have an abortifacient property in them…because they can actually cause an abortion. 

There is a really great documentary out called “28 Days on the Pill.”  I encourage people to check it out.  You can google the title and get to the website.  It was actually created by Protestant ministers.  We need churches to get on board with this and stop pushing the pill and other methods within their congregation.  The pill is not healthy for women and for marriages.  There are other ways that are better and don’t take the lives of children.  People need to know the truth.

This is so wrong


Abby is just one sole person who hasn’t done any research by herself, and you want to talk her biased word instead of the word of unbiased professionals who’s job is to be right? What the fuck?


No. It’s proven that easier access to birth control makes lower abortion rates. It’s literally proven.

http://medschool.wustl.edu/news/patient_care/Contraceptive_Choice


68%-72%.

That’s how many less abortions were reported when birth control was made free.


But nah this biased POS totally knows better.

60% of women using contraception includes ALL contraception, even the counting method which has a much higher rate of failure.

Shit argument, shit person, shit movement

-Ash

Abby Johnson’s stats make no sense without context. She makes it sound like 60 percent of all women who use contraceptives terminate when she brings in the 5-10 percent failure rate stat— if 60 percent of women who get abortions claimed to have been using some sort of contraceptive, that does not automatically make the failure rate 60 percent. That’s not how it works. 

But first, to clear up her claim that 60 percent of women claim: Most recent research from Guttmacher (July 2014) says it’s actually 51 percent of women who have abortions had used a contraceptive method in the month they got pregnant. But the methods they’re using aren’t just hormonal. According to the research, 27 percent were using condoms and just 17 percent were using hormonal methods (such as the Pill, DEPO, an IUD, etc.). This means the rest were using the pull-out method or natural family planning — both of which count as contraception. [x]

So, just 17 percent of women* are citing hormonal methods, but you’re still going to write a screed against the Pill? Ok. But let’s continue—

51 percent of 1 million women* who have abortions were using either hormonal birth control, condoms, natural family planning or the pull-out method  = 510,000 women*. That sounds like a lot, sure (keep in mind, only 17 percent of 510,000 were using hormonal contraception, 27 percent condoms).  But let’s open this up to the larger perspective. 

There are 60 million women* of reproductive age in the U.S., according to the CDC. 64 percent of those women* use contraception— that comes out to 38.4 million women*. If all types of contraception had a failure rate of 60 percent, that means millions and millions of women would get pregnant each year. (Sidenote: It’s also important for people like Johnson to note the failure rates for different types of contraceptive methods.)

On the flip side, there are about 6 million pregnancies each year in the U.S. — so 10 percent of reproductive age women* get pregnant. Of these 6 million pregnancies, the CDC says about 47 percent were unplanned, so that’s about 2.8 million pregnancies (but obviously not all unplanned pregnancies = abortion, as the abortion rate is still hovering at around 1 million).

Basically— Abby Johnson uses hype, flawed research and out-of-context stats to scare people.